Category Archives: Ultrasound

CODE BROWN: COMBATIVE AND BLEEDING

I’ve had combative patients in my ER lots of times. Combative enough to warrant sedation or anaesthesia. And bleeding patients. Serious bleeding. Lots of times. But not the extremes of both at the same time.

Posted in Code Brown, Emergency Medicine, Trauma, Ultrasound | 11 Comments

TEE DURING CARDIAC ARREST

Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE or TOE) used to be the domain of cardiologists. It has lately seeped into other areas of medicine where hemodynamic evaluation is crucial. ICU’s and occasionally OR’s use them even for non-cardiac surgery. But the TEE probe … Continue reading

Posted in AHLR, Emergency Medicine, Ultrasound | 2 Comments

LATERAL VIEW OF THE AORTA

We normally visualise the aorta on ultrasound by scanning down the midline. However, we frequently fail to visualise the entire aorta. The view is often obscured by bowel gas. Abdominal pain often makes the examination intolerable. A small proof-of-concept study in … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

SC BETTER THAN IC

A study in AJEM compares ultrasound visualisation of the subclavian vein using the supraclavicular and infraclavicular approaches.  With the increasing dominance of procedural ultrasound in central vein cannulation, perhaps there will be a shift towards supraclavicular cannulation at the expense … Continue reading

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E-POINT SEPTAL SEPARATION

A paper in AJEM describes a way to quickly assess left ventricular function that I wasn’t too familiar with. By measuring the distance between the anterior mitral valve and interventricular septum we can roughly assess the heart’s ejection fraction.

Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine, Ultrasound | 5 Comments

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

“The CXR is a dying breed in the acute assessment of trauma.” – Brian Burns, Greater Sydney HEMS.

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PNEUMONIA AND ED ULTRASOUND

A study in AJEM sets out to compare diagnostic accuracy between chest x-rays and lung ultrasound for diagnosing pneumonia. Other recent ED studies have consistently shown how lung ultrasound outperforms chest x-rays when diagnosing pneumonia.

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Ultrasound, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

SKULL FRACTURES AND ULTRASOUND

We don’t want to irradiate young kids. On the other hand, we really don’t want to miss that skull fracture. What to do? Ultrasound to the rescue (again)?

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

SAM

Until recently I didn´t really know what SAM was. I do now. Boy am I happy. SAM stands for Systolic Anterior Motion of the Mitral valve and is a not too uncommon complication of hypertrophic cardiomyopathies (HCM), myocardial infarction and … Continue reading

Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine, Ultrasound | 3 Comments

ULTRASOUND FOR SPINALS AND EPIDURALS

This is a well known, but fairly novel use of ultrasound. Certainly not standard in any place I’ve worked. But ultrasound for epidurals and spinals seems to be in vogue. Here’s a meta-analysis on ultrasound for spinal and epidural access. … Continue reading

Posted in Anesthesia, Ultrasound | 2 Comments