Category Archives: SAR

‘THE BRAVEST MAN IN THE RAF NEVER TO HAVE FLOWN AN AEROPLANE’

Ages ago, a friend of ours mentioned videos from some dodgy WW2 immersion experiments performed by RAF doctor Edgar Pask. The expermients were part of the development of the modern lifejacket. Apparently Edgar Pask, also a professor of Anesthesia at … Continue reading

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ECMO OUTCOMES IN ACCIDENTAL HYPOTHERMIA

In accidental hypothermic cardiac arrest we are to continue CPR until the patient has been rewarmed to around 34. If available, and appropriate, these patients are to be transferred to a hospital with ECMO capability. ECMO is the most efficient … Continue reading

Posted in ECMO, Prehospital Medicine, SAR | 2 Comments

BOOM

Think about this the next time you think you know better than the fire brigade. Watch it to the end.

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HEART RATE MONITOR WATCHES IN AVALANCHES

Heart rate monitor watches are becoming increasingly popular in outdoor sports. That has resulted in some interesting case reports where heart rate recordings have been downloaded and analysed from victims´watches. The most recent one was published in Resuscitation. It details … Continue reading

Posted in CPR, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine, SAR, Uncategorized, Wilderness Medicine | 7 Comments

CHAMONIX ALPINE HEMS

Recently french TV channel France 3 aired a fascinating documentary about french mountain rescue in Chamonix. The show focuses on the particularly lethal summer climbing season of 2012. World-class HEMS done in a way you have never seen before. Some of … Continue reading

Posted in Prehospital Medicine, SAR, Wilderness Medicine | 4 Comments

DR. POPSICLE AND THE RULE OF 1-10-1

We love this guy. Dr Gordon Giesbrecht. Professor at the university of Manitoba. He studies human physiology and our responses to extreme environments. He has done some groundbreaking work in cold-stress physiology and prehospital care in hypothermia. He is one … Continue reading

Posted in Prehospital Medicine, SAR, Wilderness Medicine | 6 Comments

THE RESCUEBASKET

There are several methods for hoisting a patient into a helicopter, ranging from stretcher systems to simple slings. They all affect the respiration and hemodynamics to varying degrees, which has resulted in some serious incidents with injuries or death as … Continue reading

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AVALANCHE SURVIVAL

                  In avalanche victims the four most important factors that decide survival are degree of burial, duration of burial, the severity of trauma and finally presence of a free airway and the … Continue reading

Posted in Prehospital Medicine, SAR, Uncategorized, Wilderness Medicine | 6 Comments

INTUBATING WITH NIGHT VISION GOGGLES

RFDSdoc recently put this article in his twitter feed – ´Orotracheal intubation in darkness using night vision goggles.´ A study that proves how laryngoscopy and intubation is possible with NVGs. Being a notorious war-nerd, it is a concept that geeks me out … Continue reading

Posted in Prehospital Medicine, SAR | 1 Comment

US DETECTS PNEUMOS IN TRANSPORT?

According to a small simulator study, ultrasound might work for detecting pneumothoraces in the back of a helicopter or an ambulance. That could spare our patients from some unnecessary thoracotomies.

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