Category Archives: Emergency Medicine

THATS HOW I (WAS) ROLL(ED)

We try to avoid putting personal stuff on this blog, but my personal observations from being a trauma patient fits too well with Thomas D’s righteous rant about logrolls a few days ago.¬†He wrote about how the logroll, as a … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 2 Comments

LOG ROLL AND A FINGER UP YOUR BUM – THEN YOU’RE DONE

ATLS mythbusting time – again. ATLS provides a great structure for talking and working trauma, but many of their procedures have been rethought the last couple of years as our understanding of trauma improves. Now it’s time for rethinking the … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma | 4 Comments

CERVICAL COLLAR R.I.P.

And so the rigid cervical collar is laid to rest in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) of Bergen, Norway. Bergen is the second largest city in Norway, and has an active HEMS department at Bergen University Hospital. Particularly, HEMS doc … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 25 Comments

OPEN CHEST COMPRESSIONS IN MEDICAL CARDIAC ARREST

Despite all the thousands of man-hours and gazillions of money going into researching¬†stuff like therapeutic hypothermia and adrenaline in cardiac arrest we really haven’t got the breakthrough we deserve. With the exception of pockets of excellence, ROSC rates have been … Continue reading

Posted in CPR, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 9 Comments

CODE BROWN: EMERGENCY SURGICAL AIRWAY REVISITED

I lost my cric virginity to a man on a beach in Australia. The story told here. After this, I’ve been looking into making crics simpler and safer. Talking to colleagues, reading articles, practicing on cadavers and animals – not … Continue reading

Posted in Anesthesia, Emergency Medicine | 6 Comments

HYPOTHERMIC INFECTIONS

Adding to the discussion on therapeutic hypothermia or just avoiding hyperthermia in cardiac arrest patients after ROSC, there’s a new systematic review slash meta-analysis on infection rates in hypothermic vs normothermic patients. Prolonged therapeutic hypothermia shows an increased risk of … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care | Leave a comment

UPDATE ON THE ABDOMINAL AORTIC TOURNIQUET

Abdominal aortic tourniquets have been around as an idea for a hundred years but still haven’t been accepted as mainstream trauma care. A small study on volunteers in military medicine tests one of these devices. They seem to work.

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine, Uncategorized | 7 Comments

KANYE INTUBATE THIS GUY FOR ME PLEASE?

The decision to anaesthetise and intubate is not always an easy one. When learning to anaesthetise and intubate we are often told that a GCS of 8 or less is when the patient scores a tube in trauma. Reality is … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Emergency Medicine, Neurology, Prehospital Medicine, Trauma | Leave a comment

RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM PAEDS TRAUMA SCANS

A study from Injury quantifies the exposure to radiation from paediatric trauma scans. The study tells us children are exposed to significant doses of ionising radiation when they become trauma patients.

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Paediatrics, Trauma | Leave a comment

TRANEXAMIC ACID MATTERs

After the military showed benefit of tranexamic acid (TXA) in trauma, it was successfully tested in the large CRASH-2 trial, showing great benefit in civilians as well. Moving back to war zone trauma, MATTERs – Military Application of Tranexamic acid … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma | 3 Comments