Category Archives: Emergency Medicine

EGDT IS DEAD, LONG LIVE EGDT

And so the EGDT trilogy is complete. The results of the ProMISe trial was published, after we’ve recently had the results from the ARISE and ProCESS trials. They all compared EGDT (Early Goal-Directed Therapy) to “standard care”. And they were … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Infectious diseases, Intensive Care | 4 Comments

TEE DURING CARDIAC ARREST

Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE or TOE) used to be the domain of cardiologists. It has lately seeped into other areas of medicine where hemodynamic evaluation is crucial. ICU’s and occasionally OR’s use them even for non-cardiac surgery. But the TEE probe … Continue reading

Posted in AHLR, Emergency Medicine, Ultrasound | 2 Comments

THUNDERSTORM ASTHMA

I always thought ‘thunderstorm asthma’, localised epidemics of asthma associated with thunderstorms, was semi-factoid.  Not so.  Apparently, thunderstorms do cause asthma spikes in asthma ED attendance. This is elegantly shown in a recent Emerg Med J.

Posted in Emergency Medicine | 1 Comment

CERVICAL COLLARS SLASHED FROM GUIDELINES

There’s been a big discussion on cervical collars in trauma the recent years. We’ve covered the controversy here. Guidelines are usually slow to adapt, but now both national guidelines from the Netherlands and state guidelines from Queensland in Australia seems … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 14 Comments

LATERAL VIEW OF THE AORTA

We normally visualise the aorta on ultrasound by scanning down the midline. However, we frequently fail to visualise the entire aorta. The view is often obscured by bowel gas. Abdominal pain often makes the examination intolerable. A small proof-of-concept study in … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

I had the good fortune to visit the Museum of 1990s Trauma Care over the past two days. It's called #ATLS. Fascinating historic artifacts. — Bill Hinckley (@UCAirCareDoc) December 5, 2014

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Humour | Leave a comment

AVOID THE OXYGEN REFLEX

We’ve been waiting for the AVOID study, since we mentioned it a few years ago in another post on the harm of excessive oxygen. AVOID (Air Versus Oxygen in Myocardial Infarction). Now, it’s out. As expected, it shows that unnecessary … Continue reading

Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care | 29 Comments

QUOTE OF THE MONTH

Q: How do you approach teaching the honing of skills to picking up high risk disease with a low prevalence? A: “It is a shit-show. let’s just get it out there. these conditions should be missed or we should accept … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine | 2 Comments

THE STEEL WINDPIPE

We’ve read and heard many accounts of emergency surgical airways over the years. They’re always exciting, and there’s always something new to be learned. Most written accounts are very clinical, so we were thrilled about discovering this story. It’s not … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Emergency Medicine, Medical teaching | 4 Comments

I AM THE RESURRECTION

If you make a study on interventions on dead people, you don’t expect much. Well, the Alfred in Melbourne did such a study – and got a resurrection rate of over 50%! Their intervention group was people in refractory cardiac … Continue reading

Posted in Cardiology, ECLS, ECMO, Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care | 1 Comment