Category Archives: Emergency Medicine

BP MANAGEMENT IN BRAIN BLEEDS

There´s a nice Best BET mini review in EMJ April 2016. The authors ask if it is safe and beneficial to control hypertension in the acute/hyperacute phase (~<6h from presentation) in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage.






Posted in Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Neurology, Prehospital Medicine, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CPR AND AMIODARONE

There’s a new RCT out in NEJM on amiodarone and lidocaine in cardiac arrest. It’s an interesting study we wrote on, but needed a less categorical take. In the unselected study population, amiodarone and lidocaine did little for the patients. … Continue reading






Posted in AHLR, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 4 Comments

NEW CPR GUIDELINES

The Norwegian Resuscitation Council has released revised guidelines for CPR, and presented them at the Scandinavian conference for emergency medicine, SAM 16. These recommendations might differ from international recommendations. Click image or “more” for a quick English translation and run-through … Continue reading






Posted in AHLR, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 4 Comments

PAIN CAN´T BE USED TO DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN PARTIAL AND FULL THICKNESS BURNS

The absence of of pain has even been used to differentiate between partial and full thickness burn injury. Traditional teaching is that full thickness burns are painless due to the cutaneous nerve endings being destroyed. A paper in AJEM suggest it´s … Continue reading






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LUNG US AND BNP

A small study in Ann Intensive Care reminds me that lung ultrasound is  good at detecting heart failure and differentiating against other causes of acute dyspnoea.






Posted in Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

IT ALL STARTED WITH A PLUNGER

Anesthesia and Analgesia just published a superb review on the current edge of CPR. But everything started with a plunger. Yup! A plunger ! In the late eighties, a son resuscitated his father with the help of a plunger. Poorly … Continue reading






Posted in CPR, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | Leave a comment

OWN THE O.G.

Passing the orogastric tube can be difficult or sometimes impossible. Unfortunately a lot of patients really need their OGs and in a time-critical scenario you don’t want to spend too much time struggling with it. Here is a simple trick a senior … Continue reading






Posted in Airway management, Anesthesia, Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Prehospital Medicine, Uncategorized | 7 Comments

ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT?

An interesting survey recently published in Resuscitation looks at arrest teams for in-hospital cardiac arrest. As anyone in the FOAM-o-sphere is well aware, trauma teams, prehospital teams and ED cardiac arrest teams are increasingly well oiled and the importance of … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine | 1 Comment

ERC CERVICAL COLLAR SCEPTICS

The ERC, the European Resuscitation Council, have issued new guidelines for first aid, section 9 of their guidelines. And it includes an interesting and rather controversial take on cervical collars and spinal immobilisation that’s similar to what we have been … Continue reading






Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma | 2 Comments

ON BEING A JERK

Quickie post about an interesting paper I found. Now there is actual evidence of how being a jerk negatively impacts on team performance. An Israeli paper looks at how being exposed to rudeness affects teams in emergent situations.






Posted in Emergency Medicine, Medical teaching, Paediatrics, Uncategorized | 1 Comment