Category Archives: Emergency Medicine

LUNG US AND BNP

A small study in Ann Intensive Care reminds me that lung ultrasound is  good at detecting heart failure and differentiating against other causes of acute dyspnoea.

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

IT ALL STARTED WITH A PLUNGER

Anesthesia and Analgesia just published a superb review on the current edge of CPR. But everything started with a plunger. Yup! A plunger ! In the late eighties, a son resuscitated his father with the help of a plunger. Poorly … Continue reading

Posted in CPR, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | Leave a comment

OWN THE O.G.

Passing the orogastric tube can be difficult or sometimes impossible. Unfortunately a lot of patients really need their OGs and in a time-critical scenario you don’t want to spend too much time struggling with it. Here is a simple trick a senior … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Anesthesia, Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Prehospital Medicine, Uncategorized | 6 Comments

ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT?

An interesting survey recently published in Resuscitation looks at arrest teams for in-hospital cardiac arrest. As anyone in the FOAM-o-sphere is well aware, trauma teams, prehospital teams and ED cardiac arrest teams are increasingly well oiled and the importance of … Continue reading

Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine | 1 Comment

ERC CERVICAL COLLAR SCEPTICS

The ERC, the European Resuscitation Council, have issued new guidelines for first aid, section 9 of their guidelines. And it includes an interesting and rather controversial take on cervical collars and spinal immobilisation that’s similar to what we have been … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma | 2 Comments

ON BEING A JERK

Quickie post about an interesting paper I found. Now there is actual evidence of how being a jerk negatively impacts on team performance. An Israeli paper looks at how being exposed to rudeness affects teams in emergent situations.

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Medical teaching, Paediatrics, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

EWWW!

I found two interesting papers in EMJ. Both recently published. If you intubate a fresh frozen cadaver and ventilate you will get a transient capnography trace very similar to a trace from a living patient. I had heard about it before but … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Cardiology, CPR, Emergency Medicine | 1 Comment

WHAT THE HELL I AM DOING? I AM ENGORGING A VEIN IS WHAT I AM DOING!

I’m not sure where this fits in, in this age of ultrasounding everything, but there is an interesting short report in EMJ. It describes a simple technique to achieve IV access in patients where the periphery is shut down.  A typical scenario … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 4 Comments

THE ONE-TWO PUNCH

Interesting case reports on cardiac arrest patients with refractory VF. One was shocked 7 times – with a change in pad location. No luck. For the 8th shock, they hooked the patient up to a second defibrillator, and shocked him … Continue reading

Posted in CPR, Emergency Medicine | 5 Comments

E-CPR STRIKES AGAIN

ECMO for cardiac arrest, E-CPR, has been shown several times to increase survival more than any other intervention we have available. Here’s yet another retrospective study to support the findings in previous trials (links at end of post). Survival with … Continue reading

Posted in Cardiology, ECMO, Emergency Medicine | 11 Comments