Category Archives: Cardiology

O2 NOT NEEDED IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

There’s not much left of poor MONA. We’ve written on unnecessary O2 treatment before, ie the AVOID trial. And now, one of the large RCTs on the subject is out. The DETO2X-SWEDEHEART investigators (love the acronym) have published their findings … Continue reading






Posted in Anesthesia, Cardiology, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 2 Comments

USE ULTRASOUND FOR FEMORAL CANNULATION IN ARREST

For vascular access, you still hear the old “We don’t have time for using ultrasound – this is an emergency!”. In many settings, the old landmark techniques are quick and good in experienced hands. But when going for the femoral … Continue reading






Posted in Anesthesia, Cardiology, CPR, ECLS, ECMO, Emergency Medicine, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

TIME TO BE COOL

Cooling in cardiac arrest has had its ups and downs. First, it was cool with 32-34 degrees, then TTM said 36 degrees was fine. So, what’s the optimal brain temperature post arrest? One of the problems with the TTM study … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine | 3 Comments

TEE TRAINER

Transesophageal Echo (TEE) is a bit of a niche thing in the ultrasound world, and trying to get into TEE, I find it really hard to wrap my head around the probe’s position and the spatial relations with probe, the … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

LONGEST VF

A fascinating case report was recently published in Resuscitation. A young female speleologist was avalanched in the polish Tatra mountains. As she had access to an air pocket and some degree of ventilation she didn’t to succumb to the asphyxiation … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Prehospital Medicine, Wilderness Medicine | 3 Comments

SHOCK LIVER AFTER CARDIAC ARREST

Interesting paper in AJEM. Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), ‘shock liver’, is defined as an increase in serum aminotransferase levels (20 times the upper normal level) after respiratory or circulatory failure. It is commonly seen in critical illness and after cardiac arrest. In … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, CPR, Intensive Care, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

AFTER EIGHTY

Besides being one of the better study names around, this Norwegian RCT in the Lancet also shifted my prejudice. I was really thinking invasive vs conservative treatment for those over 80 with NSTEMI/UAP would show little difference. Maybe even a … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine | Leave a comment

ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT?

An interesting survey recently published in Resuscitation looks at arrest teams for in-hospital cardiac arrest. As anyone in the FOAM-o-sphere is well aware, trauma teams, prehospital teams and ED cardiac arrest teams are increasingly well oiled and the importance of … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine | 1 Comment

EWWW!

I found two interesting papers in EMJ. Both recently published. If you intubate a fresh frozen cadaver and ventilate you will get a transient capnography trace very similar to a trace from a living patient. I had heard about it before but … Continue reading






Posted in Airway management, Cardiology, CPR, Emergency Medicine | 1 Comment

E-CPR STRIKES AGAIN

ECMO for cardiac arrest, E-CPR, has been shown several times to increase survival more than any other intervention we have available. Here’s yet another retrospective study to support the findings in previous trials (links at end of post). Survival with … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, ECMO, Emergency Medicine | 11 Comments