Author Archives: Thomas D

AVALANCHE

ScanCrit is currently having a mini-symposium in Zermatt, and it includes leisure-time skiing. The conditions have been less than favourable, windy with low cloud cover and bad visibility – but also lots of fresh snow. This creates a high risk … Continue reading






Posted in Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine, Trauma, Wilderness Medicine | Leave a comment

ECMO AT THE LOUVRE

ECMO at the Louvre, two art forms meet. We first tweeted this photo back in 2014, and now the case report behind the image has just been published. The case report highlights both the possibilities of new frontiers in medicine, … Continue reading






Posted in CPR, ECLS, ECMO, Emergency Medicine | 2 Comments

TIME TO BE COOL

Cooling in cardiac arrest has had its ups and downs. First, it was cool with 32-34 degrees, then TTM said 36 degrees was fine. So, what’s the optimal brain temperature post arrest? One of the problems with the TTM study … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine | 3 Comments

151 DAYS ON ECMO WITH NO HEPARIN

Experimental. On a goat. But still, 151 days on ECMO without any heparinisation is very impressive and promising. One big draw-back of ECMO treatment has been the need for full heparinisation to avoid clotting of the ECMO circuit. Heparin coated … Continue reading






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ECMO IN TRAUMA

ECMO in multitrauma patients sounds like asking for complexity and lots of oozing blood – but it seems to have potential for actually stabilising the patient’s systems and get better outcome. The short version: ECMO restores normal physiology and unloads … Continue reading






Posted in ECMO, Trauma | 1 Comment

SONOSCANDINAVIA, FEB 9-11, 2017

SonoScandinavia is the melting of the successful SonoSweden/SonoSTHML and SonoNorway, bringing together the best of Scandinavian ultrasound teachers – and a bunch of ultrasound folks from the land of the Trump, like Matt Dawson of the excellent ultrasoundpodcast.com, as well … Continue reading






Posted in Ultrasound | Leave a comment

IMAGE OF THE WEEK – AORTIC STENOSIS

One of the most immediate ways to understand aortic stenosis, and how it affects blood pressure and the heart, is by watching a Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedure. Catheters are placed in both the left ventricle (LV) and the … Continue reading






Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

TEE TRAINER

Transesophageal Echo (TEE) is a bit of a niche thing in the ultrasound world, and trying to get into TEE, I find it really hard to wrap my head around the probe’s position and the spatial relations with probe, the … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

ATLS EVOLVING

We’ve often critisised ATLS. Part of it because many healthcare workers take the ATLS manual as divine law. And many of them don’t keep up with the changes in the new ATLS editions – so they cling to even older … Continue reading






Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma | 1 Comment

AFTER EIGHTY

Besides being one of the better study names around, this Norwegian RCT in the Lancet also shifted my prejudice. I was really thinking invasive vs conservative treatment for those over 80 with NSTEMI/UAP would show little difference. Maybe even a … Continue reading






Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine | Leave a comment