Author Archives: K

EWWW!

I found two interesting papers in EMJ. Both recently published. If you intubate a fresh frozen cadaver and ventilate you will get a transient capnography trace very similar to a trace from a living patient. I had heard about it before but … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Cardiology, CPR, Emergency Medicine | 1 Comment

ARCHAIC TRAUMA LIFE SUPPORT

There’s an interesting, important, editorial in Anaesthesia. It is a fair criticism of ATLS. It starts with the historical background, details it’s modern weak points and concludes with how ATLS should be regarded as an entry level course for clinicians … Continue reading

Posted in Trauma | 3 Comments

WHAT THE HELL I AM DOING? I AM ENGORGING A VEIN IS WHAT I AM DOING!

I’m not sure where this fits in, in this age of ultrasounding everything, but there is an interesting short report in EMJ. It describes a simple technique to achieve IV access in patients where the periphery is shut down.  A typical scenario … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 3 Comments

HUNGARIAN APNOEIC OXYGENATION

Apnoeic oxygenation in anaesthesia is the concept of providing oxygenation without ventilation. The idea is that even without lung expansion, oxygen will passively be dragged into the alveoli along the oxygen gradient caused by alveolar oxygen being transported away by the bloodstream. … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Prehospital Medicine | 7 Comments

PREHOSPITAL EXTRICATION TIMES

Car accidents with trapped victims can be incredibly frustrating. There is often very little one can do until the rescue services achieve extrication. Sometimes, because of limited patient access, all you can achieve during extrication is some very basic airway management, pain … Continue reading

Posted in Prehospital Medicine, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

THUNDERSTORM ASTHMA

I always thought ‘thunderstorm asthma’, localised epidemics of asthma associated with thunderstorms, was semi-factoid.  Not so.  Apparently, thunderstorms do cause asthma spikes in asthma ED attendance. This is elegantly shown in a recent Emerg Med J.

Posted in Emergency Medicine | 1 Comment

SCARY ARTERIAL AIRWAY DRAMA

Found an interesting case report in intensive care med. It describes a case where an anaesthetist found a pulsating mass in the lateral wall of the oropharynx. MR revealed the patient’s internal carotid artery was kinked, aberrant and indented way into … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management | 2 Comments

LATERAL VIEW OF THE AORTA

We normally visualise the aorta on ultrasound by scanning down the midline. However, we frequently fail to visualise the entire aorta. The view is often obscured by bowel gas. Abdominal pain often makes the examination intolerable. A small proof-of-concept study in … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma, Ultrasound | Leave a comment

EARLY VS LATE INTUBATION OF BURNS

We are taught to intubate victims with inhalational injury early. If we delay for too long the tongue, epiglottis and other structures can swell and cause airway obstruction, forcing an emergency intubation that is more likely to be difficult or failed. A … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

‘THE BRAVEST MAN IN THE RAF NEVER TO HAVE FLOWN AN AEROPLANE’

Ages ago, a friend of ours mentioned videos from some dodgy WW2 immersion experiments performed by RAF doctor Edgar Pask. The expermients were part of the development of the modern lifejacket. Apparently Edgar Pask, also a professor of Anesthesia at … Continue reading

Posted in Prehospital Medicine, SAR | Leave a comment