BEST OF 2013

iPhoneIcon_Big-27Another year comes to an end. So here’s a selection of posts from 2013. Not sure if it’s the best of ScanCrit 2013, but these are some of the posts that’s gotten the most clicks and discussion, and some we just like.

Interestingly, some of our still most read posts are from 2012 or older, but we’ve only added posts published during 2013 to the list below. We’re already looking forward to what 2014 will bring in emergency medicine and critical care!

Cervical Collar1. THE CURSE OF THE CERVICAL COLLAR
Our attack on the cervical collar was the most popular post in 2013. Probably because it’s controversial and challenging dogma – but also because deep down everyone hates cervical collars.

CXR hemothorax2. CODE BROWN: CENTRAL LINE GOES WRONG
Next in the popularity contest was this case from our Code Brown series. A central line goes terribly wrong, and ends up with a dramatic save.

iPhoneIcon_Big3. HEART RATE MONITOR WATCHES IN AVALANCHES
Third is this chilling account of survival times in avalanche victims with and without an air pocket in front of them. As told by their heart rate monitors.

fce6ef85d6fc2085d9077346e87caf1a4. TRAUMATIC ARREST ALGORITHM
In more random order we start with this new traumatic arrest algorithm published by the pre-hospital masters of London HEMS, including a link to their how-to-do-it clamshell thoracotomy for dummies article.

Atelectasis icon5. OXYGEN, ATELECTASIS AND ANAESTHESIA
Post on a great article focusing on the post-OP lung, and what we can do to optimise it in the theatre. Mostly, we focus on getting the best numbers on the theatre monitors. It’s probably way more important to focus on what to do for your patient’s post-OP lungs.

iPhoneIcon_Big-266. CENTRAL VS PERIPHERAL PRESSURE
Art lines are great. Beat-by-beat pressure readings. And they’re accurate. Most of the time. Here’s a case with readings from a critical patient with both a peripheral and central art line in place. And they don’t agree.

iPhoneIcon_Big-207. RAPTOR SUITE
Crashing trauma patients might be best handled in a RAPTOR suite, as this case from our Code Brown series.

US-pneumo8. ULTRASOUND BEST FOR PNEUMOTHORAX
For supine examination, as in a trauma patient, ultrasound is superior for finding your pneumothoraces. Also, it is less interuptive and more easily repeated than the clunky x-ray.

iPhoneIcon_Big9. THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA – NOT SO COOL
The big bomb of 2013. In interest and discussion, it’s kind of the equivalent of 2012’s HES trials. Although cooling isn’t bad for you, it doesn’t seem to be better than aggressive normothermia.

iPhoneIcon_Big10. CODE BROWN – NOT SO TERMINAL VELOCITY
Then again, everything can’t be so serious all the time. This was a potentially critical case, most likely a dead-on-arrival pre-hospital case. But with medicine, dealing with people and the strangeness of life – sometimes things turn out differently.

So there it is. Some of our top posts from 2013. There are plenty more for anyone who cares to read, but the ones who learned the most from these posts were definitely us, the ScanCrit team!

Thanks to everyone who’s been bothering to read us (thanks, mom!), and even more to our commenters and our fellow FOAMers for continuously teaching, discussing and blabbering about the world of emergency medicine and critical care.

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