Monthly Archives: July 2012

TENSION PNEUMOTHORAX: NEEDLE VS KNIFE

In my daily work, the answer is clear. It’s knife. Maybe needle decompression while waiting for the knife. Last week I was attending a conference in Mountain Medicine, and we discussed the issue. One big difference on the mountain or … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine, Wilderness Medicine | 3 Comments

EMERGENCY ECMO

“If you can put in a central line or a dialysis catheter, you can place a patient on ECMO” – Dr. Zach Shinar We have discussed ECMO-CPR, or ECLS, earlier. Those papers were on in-hospital cardiac arrests. Here’s a real … Continue reading

Posted in AHLR, Emergency Medicine | 2 Comments

SCANDINAVIAN COURSE IN PREHOSPITAL EMERGENCY MEDICINE 1st-5th OCTOBER

This post is for the Scandinavians following this blog. We need your help in advertising this scandinavian ‘Induction Course in Prehospital Emergency Medicine´. Next time to be held in Gothenburg 1-5th october. Please help us by spreading the word about this … Continue reading

Posted in Medical teaching, Prehospital Medicine | Leave a comment

CODE BROWN: DYSFUNCTIONAL TEAM AMBUSH

I would love to tell you more about the incident I was involved in a while ago. For obvious reasons I can’t.  Me, a flight nurse and two paramedics were casually moving a perfectly stable and reasonably well patient through … Continue reading

Posted in Code Brown, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 4 Comments

OF ALL THE TRIADS OF DEATH THE TRIAD OF DEATH IS THE WORST

In trauma patients hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy are known as the triad of death. Once established  they form a vicious circle that sends the patients spiralling towards death. An australian study looks at what happens to trauma mortality when patients … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Trauma | Leave a comment

EXAGGERATED REALITY

Amplifying tiny details might be big. This video shows the concept of amplifying and exaggerating subtle motion or color change in video material from standard, crude digital point & shoot cameras. To do this, the MIT Computer Science and Artificial … Continue reading

Posted in Tech | 1 Comment

THROMBOLYSIS FOR STROKE? THE IST-3 TRIAL

I am probably the last person on earth to read the IST-3 trial. In short, the authors’ conclusion of ´strong support for thrombolytics in stroke´ was pisspreik somewhat controversial and generated some discussion. Read this excellent post about the IST-3 trial and thrombolysis … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Miscellaneous, Neurology | 1 Comment

ULTRASOUNDING DIAPHRAGMAL THICKNESS

A small pilot study in Chest demonstrates how diaphragmal wasting can be measured using a simple ultrasound technique.

Posted in Intensive Care, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

ABSENCE OF TACHYCARDIA USELESS IN ANAESTHETISED BLEEDING PATIENTS

Our teaching and guidelines emphasise using tachycardia as a marker of hypovolemic shock. A paeds study in Anesthesia & Analgesia reminds us how that is far from always the case. The study makes me even more suspicious of the classic … Continue reading

Posted in Anesthesia, Emergency Medicine, Trauma | 1 Comment

INTRAVENOUS OXYGEN

Pre-oxygenation – pffft!… Who needs that?! We’ve now got i.v. oxygen to save the patient from critical hypoxemia. Dr. Kheir was involved in an incident with a critically ill 9 month old patient who sustained brain injury after prolonged hypoxemia. … Continue reading

Posted in Tech | Leave a comment