Monthly Archives: April 2012

INTUBATING WITH NIGHT VISION GOGGLES

RFDSdoc recently put this article in his twitter feed – ´Orotracheal intubation in darkness using night vision goggles.´ A study that proves how laryngoscopy and intubation is possible with NVGs. Being a notorious war-nerd, it is a concept that geeks me out … Continue reading

Posted in Prehospital Medicine, SAR | 1 Comment

SUPRAGLOTTIC AIRWAY DEVICES IN THE CRITICALLY ILL

The last five or so years there has been a shift in airway management in cardiac arrest. Endotracheal intubation in CPR used to be the gold standard, but recently supraglottic airway devices (SAD) have been gaining ground. SADs can be … Continue reading

Posted in Cardiology, CPR, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine | 10 Comments

CVC DRAINS PTRX AS WELL AS A CHEST TUBE

For the initial management of large pneumothoraces there is wide variations in clinical practice. Some sites use large ‘surgical’ chest tubes (CT) while others use smaller-bore catheters with a trend towards less invasive management. According to a study in American … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

PHEE-L-EFF PHAVES PHEEPH

Dental injuries are responsible for the majority of malpractice claims against anaesthetists. In order to get around that, I am more and more inclined to use video laryngoscopes or fibre optics, when intubating patients with really bad teeth. A small study … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Anesthesia | Leave a comment

WHAT IS THE OPTIMAL COMPRESSION DEPTH?

Since 2005 guidelines have made statements on CPR compression depth. Those first recommendations recommended a compression depth of 3,8 to 5 cm. In 2010 the recommended depth was increased to >5 cm. This was based on mostly animal data and, … Continue reading

Posted in Cardiology, CPR, Emergency Medicine, Prehospital Medicine, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

EYES IN THE NEEDLE

A Chinese research group has developed a single crystal ultrasound transducer and put it on the end of a stylet fitting inside a standard epidural needle. The ultrasound probe will let you visualise where the tip of the needle is … Continue reading

Posted in Anesthesia, Tech | 3 Comments

UPDATE – KEPLER GOES LIVE

In a previous post we discussed the robotic Kepler intubation system. We thought it was a cool concept, but didn’t really believe anyone would put it to use on human subjects any time soon. Well, they already did. In BJA … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Anesthesia | 4 Comments

CORONARY CAPSAICIN CONUNDRUM

Weird case report in Int J Emerg Med. Apparently people use cayenne pills for weight-loss. (Me, I maintain navy-seal fitness, so I wouldn’t know).  One of the active components in cayenne pepper pills is Capsaicin, a substance that increases energy expenditure … Continue reading

Posted in Emergency Medicine, Toxicology | Leave a comment

IMMEDIATE

The IMMEDIATE-trial is out. A randomised, blinded and controlled study testing early infusion of intravenous glucose-insulin-potassium(GIK) on patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The theory is that a GIK-infusion will reduce the frequency with which ACS progresses to myocardial infarction … Continue reading

Posted in Cardiology, Prehospital Medicine | Leave a comment

LMA IN NEONATE RESUS

A study in Resuscitation looking at the efficacy of LMA’s in neonatal resuscitation. Usually we use a face mask and bag them. This study shows a tiny LMA might be a better choice. So get your LMA size 1 ready … Continue reading

Posted in Airway management, Anesthesia, Paediatrics | 5 Comments