Monthly Archives: October 2011

COCHRANE, ALBUMIN AND HYPOVOLEMIA

I can´t remember ever having used albumin solutions for any patient and definitely not in hypovolemia. The SAFE study erased the remaining doubts I had. 

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PELVIC SPLINTAGE, SOME EVIDENCE EXISTS

We splint the pelvis because it makes sense. When we teach it we say it makes sense to splint the pelvis as it reduces diastasis and by doing that we reduce the volume into which fractures can bleed. 

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KIDS THESE DAYS….

There’s no reason to believe the guys I work with are more fit or strong than the average Korean medical student. That’s why a study out of European Journal of Emergency Medicine is somewhat unsettling. The study looks at strength and … Continue reading

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S.C.A.P.E.

The panicking, frothing pulmonary edema patient with hypertension and tachycardia on the verge of terminal collapse represents a challenge in the ED or ICU. Most of the time we end up intubating the patient, which comes with a whole host … Continue reading

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STATINS AGAINST TBI

Traumatic Brain Injury and the associated brain edema is a killer. Some researches hope to counter the oedema with statins.  There are several articles published on this. One just recently in Critical Care Medicine. 

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REINVENTING ANESTHESIA?

I read an article recently published in Annals of Emergency Medicine. It leaves me a bit perplexed. I struggle to see what new knowledge it brings to the field.

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