‘THE BRAVEST MAN IN THE RAF NEVER TO HAVE FLOWN AN AEROPLANE’

Ages ago, a friend of ours mentioned videos from some dodgy WW2 immersion experiments performed by RAF doctor Edgar Pask. The expermients were part of the development of the modern lifejacket. Apparently Edgar Pask, also a professor of Anesthesia at Newcastle university, had himself anaesthetised and then thrown into a pool wearing various lifejacket designs and a breathing circuit. I finally found those videos. More>>

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SONONORWAY, FEBRUARY 9.-12. 2015

The ultrasound experience is finally coming to Norway, and what a faculty! Featuring Vicky Noble, ass.prof at Harvard and director of Massachusetts General Hospital’s emergency ultrasound program. She has an impressive list of publications on ultrasound, and is also a great clinical teacher.

Great clinical teaching and a love for ultrasound is a common factor for all the faculty, which also includes Matt and Mike of ultrasoundpodcast fame, Joe Wood from the Mayo clinic, Beatrice Hoffman from Harvard and Bret Nelson who co-authored the excellent Manual of Emergency and Critical Care Ultrasound with Vicky Noble. And this is just part of the faculty!

We’re willing to bet there’s NEVER been a more competent, dedicated and internationally renowned teaching team for any ultrasound course in Norway. Ever. And YOU have the chance to have all these amazing clinical teachers at your disposal!

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I AM THE RESURRECTION

CheersIf you make a study on interventions on dead people, you don’t expect much. Well, the Alfred in Melbourne did such a study – and got a resurrection rate of over 50%! Their intervention group was people in refractory cardiac arrest – which basically means you’re dead. The majority of patients in the CHEER trial had been in cardiac arrest for well over 40 mins. That’s when most of us start thinking about throwing in the towel and call the time. But not in the Alfred. Not on Steve Bernard’s watch. More>>

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CODE BROWN: AHHH…THE OLD SCANCRIT SWITCHEROO…

iPhoneIcon_BigSomeone once said that ‘an esophageal intubation is no sin, but there is great sin in not recognizing such a placement‘.

What’s that about?

intentionally intubate the esophagus and I demand recognition for it. More>>

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SC BETTER THAN IC

iPhoneIcon_BigA study in AJEM compares ultrasound visualisation of the subclavian vein using the supraclavicular and infraclavicular approaches.  With the increasing dominance of procedural ultrasound in central vein cannulation, perhaps there will be a shift towards supraclavicular cannulation at the expense of the classical infraclavicular approach. More>>

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E-POINT SEPTAL SEPARATION

iPhoneIcon_BigA paper in AJEM describes a way to quickly assess left ventricular function that I wasn’t too familiar with. By measuring the distance between the anterior mitral valve and interventricular septum we can roughly assess the heart’s ejection fraction. More>>

Posted in Cardiology, Emergency Medicine, Ultrasound | 4 Comments

MEGAN’S SONG

There is an important article about intubation in EMSWorld. It is about a prehospital intubation gone terribly wrong. It is essential reading for all of us who manage airways outside or inside hospitals.

Read it here.Screen Shot 2014-09-16 at 10.57.15

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ETT DEPTH CONFIRMATION BY TRACHEAL PALPATION

iPhoneIcon_BigA study in Can J Anesth looks at the accuracy of confirming endotracheal tube position by palpating the sternal notch. More>>

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THE BOTTOM LINE

Bottom Line iconWhile we at ScanCrit were thinking about what a great idea it would be, The Bottom Line just went ahead and did it. And they’re still doing it: Making a library of the key articles and most important trials in intensive care medicine – and appraising them. More>>

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DONUT OF LIFE?

Randy's DonutsIt’s long been an accepted standard to stay and stabilise or go directly to OR with any unstable trauma patient – and never EVER take them to CT first. And it made sense, as radiology has never been a good place to be with critical patients. But as radiology is getting a central place in trauma care, new thinking is changing all this. Instead of keeping away, lets make the CT lab a safe critical environment. More>>

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